Total found: 153
Charles Dickens
The age of chivalry is past. Bores have succeeded to dragons.
Charles Dickens
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.
Charles Dickens
A boy's story is the best that is ever told.
Charles Dickens
There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.
Charles Dickens
Most men are individuals no longer so far as their business, its activities, or its moralities are concerned. They are not units but fractions.
Charles Dickens
The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you.
Charles Dickens
The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself.
Charles Dickens
That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society.
Charles Dickens
Electric communication will never be a substitute for the face of someone who with their soul encourages another person to be brave and true.
Charles Dickens
Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship and pass the rosy wine.
Charles Dickens
If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.
Charles Dickens
Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips.
Charles Dickens
Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he's well dressed. There ain't much credit in that.
Charles Dickens
Whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do it well whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself completely in great aims and in small I have always thoroughly been in earnest.
Charles Dickens
It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.
Charles Dickens
Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire.
Charles Dickens
The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself.
Charles Dickens
Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childhood days, recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth, and transport the traveler back to his own fireside and quiet home!
Charles Dickens
Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.
Charles Dickens
Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit ever answered to, in the strongest conjuration.
Charles Dickens
A loving heart is the truest wisdom.
Charles Dickens
Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire.
Charles Dickens
The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you.
Charles Dickens
Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many - not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.
Charles Dickens
I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance any day in the week, if there is anything to be got by it.
Charles Dickens
It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.
Charles Dickens
The men who learn endurance, are they who call the whole world, brother.
Charles Dickens
Most men are individuals no longer so far as their business, its activities, or its moralities are concerned. They are not units but fractions.
Charles Dickens
The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none.
Charles Dickens
Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, it is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy that we can scarcely mark their progress.
Charles Dickens
To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart.
Charles Dickens
Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, it is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy that we can scarcely mark their progress.
Charles Dickens
Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature.
Charles Dickens
That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society.
Charles Dickens
There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast.
Charles Dickens
I never could have done what I have done without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one subject at a time.
Charles Dickens
Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, it is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy that we can scarcely mark their progress.
Charles Dickens
I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance any day in the week, if there is anything to be got by it.
Charles Dickens
It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.
Charles Dickens
There is nothing so strong or safe in an emergency of life as the simple truth.
Charles Dickens
There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart.
Charles Dickens
A loving heart is the truest wisdom.
Charles Dickens
Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childhood days, recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth, and transport the traveler back to his own fireside and quiet home!
Charles Dickens
I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.
Charles Dickens
I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.
Charles Dickens
Never close your lips to those whom you have already opened your heart.
Charles Dickens
What greater gift than the love of a cat.
Charles Dickens
Out of my thoughts! You are part of my existence, part of myself. You have been in every line I have ever read, since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then. You have been in every prospect I have ever seen since
Charles Dickens
I wish you to know that you have been the last dream of my soul.
Charles Dickens
‎And yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that I am, into fire.
Charles Dickens
The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I love her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me, than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection.
Charles Dickens
Before I go, he said, and paused -- I may kiss her?It was remembered afterwards that when he bent down and touched her face with his lips, he murmured some words. The child, who was nearest to him, told them afterwards, and told her grandchildren when she was a handsome old lady, that she heard him say, A life you love.
Charles Dickens
The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I love her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me, than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection .
Charles Dickens
A man is lucky if he is the first love of a woman. A woman is lucky if she is the last love of a man.
Charles Dickens
Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.
Charles Dickens
That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me. But it is the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been. Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.
Charles Dickens
The most important thing in life is to stop saying 'I wish' and start saying 'I will.' Consider nothing impossible, then treat possiblities as probabilities.
Charles Dickens
And a beautiful world we live in, when it is possible, and when many other such things are possible, and not only possible, but done-- done, see you!-- under that sky there, every day.
Charles Dickens
There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.
Charles Dickens
Mr Lorry asks the witness questions:Ever been kicked? Might have been.Frequently? No. Ever kicked down stairs? Decidedly not; once received a kick at the top of a staircase, and fell down stairs of his own accord.
Charles Dickens
Never say never
Charles Dickens
I care for no man on earth, and no man on earth cares for me.
Charles Dickens
Some conjurers say that number three is the magic number, and some say number seven. It's neither my friend, neither. It's number one. (Fagin)
Charles Dickens
[She wasn't] a logically reasoning woman, but God is good, and hearts may count in heaven as high as heads.
Charles Dickens
There is a wisdom of the head, and... there is a wisdom of the heart.
Charles Dickens
Dreams are the bright creatures of poem and legend, who sport on earth in the night season, and melt away in the first beam of the sun, which lights grim care and stern reality on their daily pilgrimage through the world.
Charles Dickens
[T]he wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile.
Charles Dickens
Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when it comes.
Charles Dickens
He went to the church, and walked about the streets, and watched the people hurrying to and for, and patted the children on the head, and questioned beggars, and looked down into the kitchens of homes, and up to the windows, and found that everything could yield him pleasure. He had never dreamed of any walk, that anything, could give him so much happiness. (p. 119)
Charles Dickens
I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.
Charles Dickens
The two stand in the fast-thinning throng of victims, but they speak as if they were alone. Eye to eye, voice to voice, hand to hand, heart to heart, these two children of the Universal Mother, else so wide apart and differing, have come together on the dark highway, to repair home together and to rest in her bosom.
Charles Dickens
In a word, it was impossible for me to separate her, in the past or in the present, from the innermost life of my life.
Charles Dickens
The boy was lying, fast asleep, on a rude bed upon the floor; so pale with anxiety, and sadness, and the closeness of his prison, that he looked like death; not death as it shews in shroud and coffin, but in the guise it wears when life has just departed; when a young and gentle spirit has, but an instant, fled to Heaven: and the gross air of the world has not had time to breathe upon the changing dust it hallowed.
Charles Dickens
Oh cold, cold, rigid, dreadful Death, set up thine altar here, and dress it with such terrors as thou hast at thy command: for this is thy dominion! But of the loved, revered, and honoured head, thou canst not turn one hair to thy dread purposes, or make one feature odious. It is not that the hand is heavy and will fall down when released; it is not that the heart and pulse are still; but that the hand was open, generous, and true; the heart brave, warm, and tender; and the pulse a man's. Strike, Shadow, strike! And see his good deeds springing from the wound, to sow the world with life immortal.
Charles Dickens
Poetry makes life what lights and music do the stage.
Charles Dickens
She dotes on poetry, sir. She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself, sir. You may have met with her 'Ode to an Expiring Frog,' sir.
Charles Dickens
Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.
Charles Dickens
It is no worse, because I write of it. It would be no better, if I stopped my most unwilling hand. Nothing can undo it; nothing can make it otherwise than as it was.
Charles Dickens
An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself.
Charles Dickens
It is the fate of most men who mingle with the world, and attain even the prime of life, to make many real friends, and lose them in the course of nature. It is the fate of all authors or chroniclers to create imaginary friends, and lose them in the course of art. Nor is this the full extent of their misfortunes; for they are required to furnish an account of them besides.
Charles Dickens
It is not possible to know how far the influence of any amiable, honest-hearted duty-doing man flies out into the world, but it is very possible to know how it has touched one's self in going by.
Charles Dickens
Mrs Joe was a very clean housekeeper, but had an exquisite art of making her clenliness more umcomfortable and unacceptable than dirt itself. Cleanliness is next to godliness, and some people do the same by their religion.
Charles Dickens
Mrs. Joe war eine sehr reinliche Hausfrau, doch sie verstand sich ausnehmend gut darauf, ihre Reinlichkeit bequemer und unerträglicher zu machen, als jeder Schmutz gewesen wäre. Die Reinlichkeit ist der Gottesfurcht verwandt, und manche verfahren mit ihrer Religion ganz genauso.
Charles Dickens
Your haughty religious people would have held their heads up to see me as I am tonight, and preached of flames and vengeance,' cried the girl. 'Oh, dear lady, why ar'n't those who claim to be God's own folks as gentle and as kind to us poor wretches as you, who, having youth, and beauty, and all that they have lost, might be a little proud instead of so much humbler?
Charles Dickens
So, I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me.
Charles Dickens
In the little world in which children have their existence, whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice.
Charles Dickens
Now, what I want is Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts; nothing else will ever be of any service to them.
Charles Dickens
He had been educated in no habits of application and concentration. The system which had addressed him in exactly the same manner as it had addressed hundreds of other boys, all varying in character and capacity, had enabled him to dash through his tasks, always with fair credit and often with distinction, but in a fitful, dazzling way that had confirmed his reliance on those very qualities in himself which it had been most desirable to direct and train. They were good qualities, without which no high place can be meritoriously won, but like fire and water, though excellent servants, they were very bad masters. If they had been under Richard's direction, they would have been his friends; but Richard being under their direction, they became his enemies.
Charles Dickens
I never heard that it had been anybody's business to find out what his natural bent was, or where his failings lay, or to adapt any kind of knowledge to him. He had been adapted to the verses and had learnt the art of making them to such perfection. I did doubt whether Richard would not have profited by some one studying him a little, instead of his studying them quite so much.
Charles Dickens
He was always so zealous and honorable in fulfilling his compact with me, that he made me zealous and honorable in fulfilling mine with him. If he had shown indifference as a master, I have no doubt I should have returned the compliment as a pupil. He gave me no such excuse, and each of us did the other justice.
Charles Dickens
They ran their heads very hard against wrong ideas, and persisted in trying to fit the circumstances to the ideas instead of trying to extract ideas from the circumstances.
Charles Dickens
I have a pretty large experience of boys, and you're a bad set of fellows. Now mind!
Charles Dickens
He couldn't be a doctor, or he would have a quieter and more persuasive manner.
Charles Dickens
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pound ought and six, result misery.
Charles Dickens
Where is your false, your treacherous, and cursed wife?She's gone forrard to the Police Office, returns Mr Bucket. You'll see her there, my dear.I would like to kiss her! exclaims Mademoiselle Hortense, panting tigress-like. You'd bite her, I suspect, says Mr Bucket.I would! making her eyes very large. I would love to tear her, limb from limb.Bless you, darling, says Mr Bucket, with the greatest composure; I'm fully prepared to hear that. Your sex have such a surprising animosity against one another, when you do differ.
Charles Dickens
She was the most wonderful woman for prowling about the house. How she got from one story to another was a mystery beyond solution. A lady so decorous in herself, and so highly connected, was not to be suspected of dropping over the banisters or sliding down them, yet her extraordinary facility of locomotion suggested the wild idea.
Charles Dickens
You are hard at work madam , said the man near her.Yes, Answered Madam Defarge ; I have a good deal to do.What do you make, Madam ?Many things.For instance ---For instance, returned Madam Defarge , composedly ,Shrouds.The man moved a little further away, as soon as he could, feeling it mightily close and oppressive .
Charles Dickens
It was all Mrs. Bumble. She would do it, urged Mr. Bumble; first looking round, to ascertain that his partner had left the room.That is no excuse, returned Mr. Brownlow. You were present on the occasion of the destruction of these trinkets, and, indeed, are the more guilty of the two, in the eye of the law; for the law supposes that your wife acts under your direction.If the law supposes that, said Mr. Bumble, squeezing his hat emphatically in both hands, the law is a ass
Charles Dickens
There was a piece of ornamental water immediately below the parapet, on the other side, into which Mr. James Harthouse had a very strong inclination to pitch Mr. Thomas Gradgrind Junior.
Charles Dickens
Sir, returned Mrs. Sparsit, I cannot say that i have heard him precisely snore, and therefore must not make that statement. But on winter evenings, when he has fallen asleep at his table, I have heard him, what I should prefer to describe as partially choke. I have heard him on such occasions produce sounds of a nature similar to what may be heard in dutch clocks. Not, said Mrs. Sparsit, with a lofty sense of giving strict evidence, That I would convey any imputation on his moral character. Far from it.
Charles Dickens
The doctor seemed especially troubled by the fact of the robbery having been unexpected, and attempted in the night-time; as if it were the established custom of gentlemen in the housebreaking way to transact business at noon, and to make an appointment, by the twopenny post, a day or two previous.
Charles Dickens
That, they never could lay their heads upon their pillows; that, they could never tolerate the idea of their wives laying their heads upon their pillows; that, they could never endure the notion of their children laying their heads on their pillows; in short , that there never more could be , for them or theirs , any laying of heads upon pillows at all , unless the prisioner's head was taken off.The Attorney General during the trial of Mr. Darnay
Charles Dickens
I only hope, for the sake of the rising male sex generally, that you may be found in as vulnerable and soft-hearted a mood by the first eligible young fellow who appeals to your compassion.
Charles Dickens
There never was a man with such a face as yours, unless it was your father, and I suppose he is singeing his grizzled red beard by this time, unless you came straight from the old un without any father at all betwixt you; which I shouldn't wonder at, a bit.
Charles Dickens
I can't go into a long explanation before company; but I couldn't help it, upon my honour.Upon your what? growled Sikes, with excessive disgust. Here! Cut me off a piece of that pie, one of you boys,to take the taste of that out of my mouth, or it'll choke me dead.
Charles Dickens
Why look'e, young gentleman, said Toby, when a man keeps himself so very ex-clusive as I have done, and by that means has a snug house over his head with nobody a-prying and smelling about it, it's rather a starling thing to have the honour of a wisit from a young gentleman (however respectable and pleasant a person he may be to play cards with at conweniency) circumstanced as you are.
Charles Dickens
There are a good many books, are there not, my boy? said Mr. Brownlow, observing the curiosity with which Oliver surveyed the shelves that reached from the floor to the ceiling.A great number, sir, replied Oliver; I never saw so many.You shall read them if you behave well, said the old gentleman kindly; and you will like that, better than looking at the outsides, - that is, in some cases, because there are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.
Charles Dickens
...and he glanced at the backs of the books, with an awakened curiosity that went below the binding. No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot.
Charles Dickens
Bless the bright eyes of your sex! They never see, whether for good or bad, more than one side of any question; and that is always, the one which first presents itself to them.
Charles Dickens
There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose.
Charles Dickens
You touch some of the reasons for my going, not for my staying away.
Charles Dickens
The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.
Charles Dickens
There can't be a quarrel without two parties, and I won't be one. I will be a friend to you in spite of you. So now you know what you've got to expect
Charles Dickens
Those darling byegone times, Mr Carker,' said Cleopatra, 'with their delicious fortresses, and their dear old dungeons, and their delightful places of torture, and their romantic vengeances, and their picturesque assaults and sieges, and everything that makes life truly charming! How dreadfully we have degenerated!
Charles Dickens
The Northern onslaught upon slavery was no more than a piece ofspecious humbug designed to conceal it's desire for economic control ofthe Southern states.
Charles Dickens
Since I knew you, I have been troubled by a remorse that I thought would never reproach me again, and have heard whispers from old voices impelling me upward, that I thought were silent for ever. I have had unformed ideas of striving afresh, beginning anew, shaking off sloth and sensuality, and fighting out the abandoned fight. A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.
Charles Dickens
A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.
Charles Dickens
I have had unformed ideas of striving afresh, beginning anew, shaking off sloth and sensuality, and fighting out the abandoned fight. A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.
Charles Dickens
The dreams of childhood
Charles Dickens
Such a number of nights,' said the girl, with a touch of woman's tenderness, which communicated something like sweetness of tone, even to her voice; 'such a number of nights as I've been patient with you, nursing and caring for you, as if you had been a child: and this the first that I've seen you like yourself; you wouldn't have served me as you did just now, if you'd thought of that, would you? Come, come; say you wouldn't.
Charles Dickens
I think I know the delights of freedom
Charles Dickens
But struggling with these better feelings was pride,--the vice of the lowest and most debased creatures no less than of the high and self-assured. The miserable companion of thieves and ruffians, the fallen outcast of low haunts, the associate of the scourings of the jails and hulks, living within the shadow of the gallows itself,--even this degraded being felt too proud to betray a feeble gleam of the womanly feeling which she thought a weakness, but which alone conneced her with that humanity, of which her wasting life had obliterated so many, many traces when a very child.
Charles Dickens
The year was dying early, the leaves were falling fast, it was a raw cold day when we took possession, and the gloom of the house was most depressing. The cook (an amiable woman, but of a weak turn of intellect) burst into tears on beholding the kitchen, and requested that her silver watch might be delivered over to her sister (2 Tuppintock's Gardens, Liggs's Walk, Clapham Rise), in the event of anything happening to her from the damp. Streaker, the housemaid, feigned cheerfulness, but was the greater martyr. The Odd Girl, who had never been in the country, alone was pleased, and made arrangements for sowing an acorn in the garden outside the scullery window, and rearing an oak.
Charles Dickens
Company, you see - company is - is - it's a very different thing from solitude - an't it?
Charles Dickens
And who among the company at Monseigneur's reception in that seventeen hundred and eightieth year of our Lord, could possibly doubt, that a system rooted in a frizzled hangman, powdered, gold-laced, pumped, and white-silk stockinged, would see the very stars out!
Charles Dickens
My heart is set, as firmly as ever heart of man was set on woman. I have no thought, no view, no hope, in life beyond her; and if you oppose me in this great stake, you take my peace and happiness in your hands, and cast them to the wind.
Charles Dickens
Women can always put things in fewest words. Except when it's blowing up; and then they lengthens it out.
Charles Dickens
I know that she deserves the best and purest love the heart of man can offer, said Mrs. Maylie; I know that the devotion and affection of her nature require no ordinary return, but one that shall be deep and lasting.
Charles Dickens
The girl's life had been squandered in the streets, and among the most noisome of the stews and dens of London, but there was something of the woman's original nature left in her still; and when she heard a light step approaching the door opposite to that by which she had entered, and thought of the wide contrast which the small room would in another moment contain, she felt burdened with the sense of her own deep shame: and shrunk as though she could scarcely bear the presence of her with whom she had sought this interview.
Charles Dickens
Always the way! muttered the Jew to himself as he turned homewards. The worst of these women is, that a very little thing serves to call up some long-forgotten feeling; and the best of them is, that it never lasts. Ha! ha!
Charles Dickens
Sudden shifts and changes are no bad preparation for political life.
Charles Dickens
The change was made in me; the thing was done. Well or ill done, excusably or inexcusably, it was done.
Charles Dickens
The present representative of the Dedlocks is an excellent master. He supposes all his dependents to be utterly bereft of individual characters, intentions, or opinions, and is persuaded that he was born to supersede the necessity of their having any. If he were to make a discovery to the contrary, he would be simply stunned
Charles Dickens
He has the power to render us happy or unhappy, to make our service light or burdensome, a pleasure or a toil. Say that his power lies in words and looks, in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count 'em up; what then? The happiness he gives is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.
Charles Dickens
She led me to believe we will going fast because her thoughts were going fast.
Charles Dickens
The miserable man was a man of that confined stolidity of mind that he could not discuss my prospects without having me before him.
Charles Dickens
It was not because I had a strong sense of the virtue of industry, but because Joe had a strong sense of the virtue of industry, that I worked with tolerable zeal against the grain.
Charles Dickens
Be natural my children. For the writer that is natural has fulfilled all the rules of art.(Last words, according to Dickens's obituary in The Times.)
Charles Dickens
There are only two styles of portrait painting: the serious and the smirk.
Charles Dickens
It can't be supposed, said Joe. Tho' I'm oncommon fond of reading, too.Are you, Joe?Oncommon. Give me, said Joe, a good book, or a good newspaper, and sit me down afore a good fire, and I ask no better. Lord! he continued, after rubbing his knees a little, when you do come to a J and a O, and says you, 'Here, at last, is a J-O, Joe,' how interesting reading is!
Charles Dickens
It was considered at the time a striking proof of virtue in the young king that he was sorry for his father's death;but, as common subjects have that virtue too, sometimes, we will say no more about it.
Charles Dickens
I mean a man whose hopes and aims may sometimes lie (as most men's sometimes do, I dare say) above the ordinary level, but to whom the ordinary level will be high enough after all if it should prove to be a way of usefulness and good service leading to no other. All generous spirits are ambitious, I suppose, but the ambition that calmly trusts itself to such a road, instead of spasmodically trying to fly over it, is of the kind I care for.
Charles Dickens
What is he to learn? To imitate? Or to avoid? When your friends the bees worry themselves about their sovereign, and become perfectly distracted touching the slightest monarchical movement, are we men to learn the greatness of Tuft-hunting, or the littleness of the Court Circular? I am not clear, Mr. Boffin, but that the hive may be satirical.'At all events, they work,' said Mr. Boffin.Ye-es,' returned Eugene, disparagingly, 'they work; but don't you think they overdo it?
Charles Dickens
...I do come home at Christmas. We all do, or we all should. We all come home, or ought to come home, for a short holiday - the longer, the better - from the great boarding-school, where we are forever working at our arithmetical slates, to take, and give a rest. As to going a visiting, where can we not go, if we will; where have we not been, when we would; starting our fancy away from our Christmas Tree!
Charles Dickens
How could you give me life, and take from me all the inappreciable things that raise it from the state of conscious death? Where are the graces of my soul? Where are the sentiments of my heart? What have you done, oh, Father, What have you done with the garden that should have bloomed once, in this great wilderness here? Said louisa as she touched her heart.
Charles Dickens
Let the tears which fell, and the broken words which were exchanged in the long close embrace between the orphans, be sacred. A father, sister, and mother, were gained, and lost, in that one moment. Joy and grief were mingled in the cup; but there were no bitter tears: for even grief arose so softened, and clothed in such sweet and tender recollections, that it became a solemn pleasure, and lost all character of pain.
Charles Dickens
Joy and grief were mingled in the cup; but there were no bitter tears: for even grief itself arose so softened, and clothed in such sweet and tender recollections, that it became a solemn pleasure, and lost all character of pain
Charles Dickens
They looked at one another, and their hearts died within them.
Charles Dickens
It was all Mrs. Bumble. She would do it, urged Mr. Bumble; first looking round, to ascertain that his partner had left the room.That is no excuse, returned Mr. Brownlow. You were present on the occasion of the destruction of these trinkets, and, indeed, are the more guilty of the two, in the eye of the law; for the law supposes that your wife acts under your direction.If the law supposes that, said Mr. Bumble, squeezing his hat emphatically in both hands, the law is a ass
Charles Dickens
It will be your duty, and it will be your pleasure too to estimate her (as you chose her) by the qualities that she has, and not by the qualities she may not have.
Charles Dickens
If an enthusiastic, ardent, and ambitous man marry a wife on whose name there is a stain, which, though it originate in no fault of hers, may be visited by cold and sordid people upon her, and upon his children also: and, in exact proportion to his success in the world, be cast in his teeth, and made the subject of sneers against him: he may-no matter how generous and good his nature- one day repent of the connection he formed in early life; and she may have the pain and torture of knowing that he does so.
Charles Dickens
I assumed my first undivided responsibility.
Charles Dickens
It is the most miserable thing to feel ashamed at home.