Total found: 19
Liane Moriarty
We were so happy.
Liane Moriarty
She quite liked this aspect of her personality, the way her mood could change from melancholy to euphoric because of a breeze or a flavor or a beautiful chord progression. It meant she never had to feel too down about feeling down.
Liane Moriarty
Baths, she thought, were just like her relationships, all ooh, ah in the beginning and then suddenly, without warning, she had to get out, out, out!
Liane Moriarty
It was strange, because she always felt that she hid herself from Erika, that she was more 'herself' with her 'true' friends, where the friendship flowed in an ordinary, uncomplicated, grown-up fashion (emails, phone calls, drinks, dinners, banter and jokes that everyone got), but right now it felt like none of those friends knew her the raw, ugly, childish, basic way that Erika did.
Liane Moriarty
Toxic' was actually an accurate description of the feelings Clementine had so often felt in Erika's presence: the intense aggravation she had to work so hard to resist and conceal, the disappointment with herself, because Erika wasn't evil or cruel or stupid, she was simply annoying, and Clementine's response to her annoyingness was so completely disporportionate, it embarassed and confounded her. Erika loved Clementine. She'd do anything for her. So why did she inflame Clementine so? It was like she was allergic to her.
Liane Moriarty
One of the multitudes of exboyfriends had been a country music fan and left Gemma with an unfortunate passion for Tammy Wynette. It was like, Cat thought, he'd given her herpes.
Liane Moriarty
Somehow she knew there would be an unspoken truce on their unspoken battle over God knew what when they were old. They could both surrender to their innate grumpiness. It was going to be a lovely relief.
Liane Moriarty
It's because we live in a beauty-obsessed society where the most important thing a woman can do is make herself attractive to men.
Liane Moriarty
If someone had asked him about his dreams on the morning of the barbecue, he would have said that he didn't want for much, but he wouldn't mind a lower mortgage, a tidier house, another baby - ideally a son, but he'd take another girl no problem at all - a big motherfucking boat if it were up for grabs, and more sex. He would have laughed about the sex. Or smiled at least. A rueful smile. Maybe the smile would have been exactly halfway between rueful and bitter.
Liane Moriarty
Something snapped, said Madeline. She saw Perry's hand shining back in its graceful, practiced arc. She heard Bonnie's guttural voice. It occurred to her that there were so many levels of evil in the world. Small evils like her own malicious words. Like not inviting a child to a party. Bigger evils like walking out on your wife and newborn baby or sleeping with your child's nanny. And then there was the sort of evil which Madeline had no experience: cruelty in hotel rooms and violence in suburban homes and little girls sold like merchandise, shattering innocent hearts.
Liane Moriarty
And maybe it was more than that.Maybe it was actually an unspoken instant agreement between the four women on the balcony: No woman should pay for the accidental death of this particular man. Maybe it was an involuntary, atavistic response to thousands of years of violence against women. Maybe it was for every rape, every brutal backhanded slap, every other Perry that had come before this one.
Liane Moriarty
She had too much imagination. Too much empathy [...] there was real pain in the world, right this very moment people were suffering unimaginable atrocities and you couldn't close your heart completely, but you couldn't leave it wide open either, because otherwise how could you possibly live your life, when through pure, random luck you got to live in paradise?
Liane Moriarty
Sometimes there was the pure, primal pain of grief, and other times there was anger, the frantic desire to claw and hit and kill, and sometimes, like right now, ther was just ordinary, dull sadness, settling itself softly, suffocatingly over her like a heave fog.She was just so damned sad.
Liane Moriarty
You okay, Mum? said Rob.I'm fine, said Rachel. She went to reach for her cup of coffee and found that she didn't have the energy to even lift her arm.
Liane Moriarty
It's about making a choice to make your marriage a priority, to, kind of, put that at the top of the page, as your mission statement or something.
Liane Moriarty
This was historical revisionism at its best, and hadn't Sam always specialized in that, hadn't she always said she wished she had a permanent film rolling of their life so she could go back and prove that, yes, he did so say that thing he now denied?
Liane Moriarty
She meant that they'd never used words like separation and divorce even in their worst screaming matches. They yelled things like, You're infuriating! You don't think! You are the most annoying woman in the history of annoying women! I hate you! I hate you more! and they always, always used the word always, even though Clementine's mother had said you should never use that word in an argument with your spouse, as in, for example, You always forget to refill the water jug! (But Sam did always forget. It was accurate.)
Liane Moriarty
If he could just have one more chance, he'd act like the man he'd always believed himself to be.
Liane Moriarty
Why hadn't that been part of his stupid lifelong redemption program: Do what my wife asks immediately so she doesn't feel like a nag.